How to Use the Newgy Robot to Develop Chaotic Relaxation.

Newgy Robo-Pong

One of the key techniques to developing a higher level of play is to learn to relax while accurately focusing ones energy during a game, especially when making a stroke at the ball. Fluid motion may be that extra ingredient that has made a decisive world champion out of Waldner.

The best environment for testing relaxation ability is, of course, a chaotic one. Chaos is very easy to create with the Newgy robot, though it is not merely a matter of turning all of the controls up to 10! Here are the settings that I use. Place the head angle to deliver the ball onto the player's side of the table first, the spin control to topspin, the oscillator range levers to position 3 & 4, the ball speed to 10, the ball frequency to 5, and the ball oscillation speed to 6.

The oscillation lever settings sweep balls across the whole table, the high speed forces one to react quickly, the frequency (being at the midpoint) provides plenty of aerobic challenge, and the oscillation speed at 6 is chosen to form an unpredictable spray pattern.

These settings will prove at least 3 things to any developing player. First, returning most of the balls is impossible without relaxing the shoulders, elbow, wrist, and grip. Second, you really don't relax as much as you think you do, until you put yourself to a test like this one. Third, using the Newgy robot is the only way to provide a sustained test of your relaxation ability and the means to improve this essential aspect of your game.

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Videotape Analysis of Technique II

Newgy Robo-Pong

I consider using the Newgy Robot for technical evaluation my most effective teaching technique. I videotape players hitting 10 balls per stroke. I tape from the side view, and a 45 degree angle to the player on the opposite side of the table. I do this with the chop,push,and drive on both the forehand and backhand. I also tape the player serving. I then do a "voice-over" where I break down the player's strokes step by step, and I explain the necessary changes a player needs to make to improve their game. The "voice-over" is my voice on the tape giving this evaluation of the player's technique and form. The Newgy Robot is requisite because it allows the player to hit the ball without concentrating on anything but form. This also allows me to see the basic stroke and critique it. The Robot cuts down on human error and allows myself to get a clear view of a player's technique and also allowing me to accurately label problems in order to fix them.

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Master Your Technique & Maximize Your Rating

Newgy Robo-Pong

Physical talent is the primary ingredient of any athlete. However, in Table Tennis physical talent alone is not enough. There are numerous Table Tennis players who possess great physical talent, although they have outstanding shots, and picture perfect styles but they never reach the heights they desire. Table Tennis competition is always changing due to conditions. Styles, equipment and the unfamiliarity of the opponents confuse, bewilder and humble the best of players when confronted with circumstances they can't adjust to. 

Many top rated Table Tennis players are flustered by some players. The reason for this perplexity is their failure to recognize the mental dimensions in their game. Therein lies the disparity separating the over-achievers from the under-achievers.

What constitutes a sound mental game can be broken down into the following qualities. Awareness and intelligence are the two most important keys to success. Good strokes and footwork can be beneficial, but the better players are quick to recognize and play to the opponent's weakness. One principle is unchanged—your paramount thought process is that the opponent's weakness dictates the proper shots to score. You win by adjusting to what the opponent permits. Perhaps you may get away with one or two shots that aren't condusive to the conditions at hand, but as a general rule, they will fail. 

Unfortunately, many aspiring Table Tennis players believe that excessive speed and spin are the answer to success. They revel at the sight of the fast spinning loop that jumps off the opponent's side of the table but they're never in position to defend the return. I refer to this as a Hollywood shot. These shots are exciting to watch but rarely lead to victory. 

A Table Tennis player's best assets are the supreme ability to spot weaknesses and the confidence to adapt their game to take advantage of match situations. Remember; Concentration, Control and Confidence are the three C's that will maximize your rating.

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